Smoked Salmon producers since 1782

K.R.D Salmon Fishery in Killorglin County Kerry was founded in 1782.
We continues the tradition of producing wild Irish smoked salmon by harvesting the wild salmon from the River Laune which flows alongside the fishery.
We also smoke Organic salmon from the coastal waters of Ireland’s atlantic coast.
The excellence of K.R.D. smoked salmon is unrivaled. Our salmon has graced the tables of many world renowned establishments including the White House and New Yorks famous Russian Tea Rooms



  • The Laune is the principal river in Co. Kerry, Its clear unpolluted water flows from the lower lake of Killlarney into Castlemaine harbour and then on to join the Atlantic in Dingle Bay.
    As it passes through the sloping countryside near Killorglin On the right bank by the river’s edge stands the complex of the picturesque buildings know as “The Fishery“.
    Within these walls in 1849 a partnership of Salmon buyers was established was to trade for more than a century. The men involved were Samuel Kearys of Cork City, Messrs. G Ronayne of Youghal, Co Cork, and local man Willian Dodd. They traded as K.R.D. firm employed a workforce of over fifty fishermen.
    January 17th each year has been the traditional date for the start of the salmon net fishing on the River laune for the K.R.D. Company. In the past number of years the opening has for various reasons been delayed by six weeks or so.

    Preparing wild salmon for the smoker

  • KRD Fishery Killorglin in 1886.

    KRD fisheries producing smoked salmon since 1782 note the boats in the foreground are very similar to those used today” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover”] During recent years the boats have been brought to their fishing grounds by their respective crews to start a new season in the search for the elusive salmon. Generations of men from the steelroe district have had good seasonable employment as fishermen for K.R.D. The work of handling the boats and nets is more or less a specialised job and has been handed down from father to son and grandson for as many generations.
    For preserving fish two ice houses were built close to the town near Farrantooreen Lake. Those were dug twenty five feet into the ground, stone lined and thatched. Entry was through a small opening where the ice taken from the lake in those arctic winters was stored the ice was used to as a required preservative for the salmon in transit boxes. This system endured for many years until the advanced of science found a way to produce ice artificially. The firm also employed a full-time boat builder a net-maker, a weight-master and a manager